Archive for October, 2016

Barang on a motorcycle, day III

06/10/2016

It had been raining in the afternoons in Phnom Penh and rained the afternoon  travelling to Kratie so the thought was that an early start would get the travel out of the way by the time the rains came. Unfortunately breakfast took longer than intended as a result of slow service, getting cash etc it was well into the morning before the leaving of Kratie happened. I was not far out of it either when the rains started. Lightly at first, then the heavens opened and, despite taking shelter in a petrol station, I was soaked. I carried on and got to the morning’s destination.

The first thing I saw was the pictures of the dolphins on the sign in the big picture then the gateway in the smaller picture at the bottom. So I stopped and paid for my boat and a drizzle started almost immediately. Then it stopped then we headed into the rain you could see in the picture (top right) and I was wet through again. I even put on the life-jacket to have something for the rain to hit upon.

After about twenty minutes the rain, it stopped (Bottom top right) and then the boat stopped and things went very quiet. The driver indicated something but I could see nothing, then a fin, then the Mekong Dolphins in all their glory.

Everything I had hoped for, to see these rare, threatened, majestic creatures. On the way back we passed islands which were inhabited and being cultivated. People whose existence is said to be threatened, just like the dolphins, by proposals for dams on the river.

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Back on the road and it was pretty much as it had been the day before. On the left-hand side properties heading down to the river and on the right ones in the forest or heading out into paddies and cultivated fields. A paved road so danger was less. It was never possible to get up much speed as all the time you were keeping your eyes peeled for animals or children running into the road, slowing down when there was a dog or a chicken, or a child who insisted in remaining in the road. The biggest offenders in staying in the road and staring at you were cows.

kratie-to-stung-treng-google-maps

As you can see from the map above after a while I moved away from the riverside and traveled through a more rural route which had fewer homesteads alongside the road but more cows in the road. As also seen from the map, at Sangkum I joined National Highway 7 and the quality of the road improved significantly. Most houses were further back and when you went through built up areas people and animals were more aware of the traffic. If they weren’t the lorries screaming through would soon have made sure everyone else didn’t forget. The lorries added to the fun when a hilly stretch came and then they were to be overtaken,  then they would want to pass when heading downhill, and repeat. Then the rain came back.

I dived into the first place I found by the side of the road. Where the above film was taken from. The people running the shop must have been used to giving shelter from the storm to people, I bought some things from them then was offered some food. It was now into the afternoon and I had had nothing since breakfast so the noodles with salad and an omelet was most welcome. You can see how wet I was.

 

the-rain-came-down-so-i-ate

The redcoats are coming! Once the rain stopped most of the journey was uneventful, apart from trying to start in neutral after asking the way in O’Pong Muon and being laughed at  by the local people. Closing in on Stung Treng it started to rain again so I opened the throttle and tried to get there as quickly as possible, finishing up in a pharmacists on the outskirts of town. My thumb on my left, inside just below the knuckle, had got blisters each day from the grip for the handlebars and using the clutch. I had bought the see-through plasters but they had fallen off in the rain and made things worse so I was looking for industrial strength elastoplast type (other plaster types are available) plasters which they had and I was able to put on. Whilst there I rang the guesthouse for directions and, after conversations with a few people, they said someone would come to collect me. Typical of the friendliness I found whilst travelling, the pharmacist brought out a chair for me to sit on whilst waiting and sheltering from the rain.

When the person from the guesthouse arrived the rain had diminished and I followed them to it only to find, coincidence or irony of the day, that there was no water. So, I got moved to their other one which was a result as it was in the centre of town and I could walk to restaurants etc from it. After a shower and change of clothes I walked down to Ponika’s Place, recommended in the guide, for a very nice meal. I was willlingly sold some carry-outs as the owner and partner wanted to get to a birthday party and went back to my room for a read, drink and then sleep.

Barang on a motorcycle, day II

04/10/2016

So, yesterday was get going and recover from the evening before. As I said I have explored Kampong Cham and you can read about it here, here and here. Today I wanted to visit something I had not visited before and then get to Kratie, via Hanchey Hill, which I had not seen before either and the ferry at Steung Trenung.(222 on the map here and the interweb thingy is no better to it.)

kampong-cham-to-kratie

First was something I had wanted to see since pouring over the maps after my previous visit, the last surviving wooden temple in Cambodia (the Khmer Rouge had destroyed all the others but this survived thanks to being used as a hospital) at Wat Mohaleap. I was given a metaled route to follow by the fab people at Mekong Crossing Guest House, who also said the river was very high. Well, they were right as the river said I was not visiting the Wat:

So, I turned back, went back over the bridge into Kampong Cham and headed out of the city on the western side of the Mekong. I headed up route 220, which was just like any English country ‘C’ road passing though villages and with occasional glimpses of the mighty Mekong to Wat Hanchey and, as luck would have it, missed the entrance so had to go back to get to the entrance. As luck would also have it, many people talk about the walk up but, having found the road up, I was able to ride up in comfort to:

A few kilometres up the road I came to Steung Treung, which is a real place with a ferry crossing of the Mekong though the internet does not avow much of its existence. The ferry was on the other side and, on coming back it was clear how strong the river was. I took the obligatory photos and made the obligatory social media comment about the ‘ferry ‘cross the Mekong’:

So, according to the guide that was 31 kilometres done and it was around midday with another 78 to do. So I motored on. Initially it was like the bit before the ferry with largely riverside villages interspersed with areas of forest with fewer people. All the time though looking for someone, a child, an animal running out into the road. After a while the road became higher and the river had clearly broken its banks and the countryside on either side was flooded. Then there were herds of cows, goats, buffalo and other animals being taken back to the house over night. I had got used to avoiding most animals, then all of a sudden there was a commotion, people were running alongside the road and there were throngs of people. I came to a bridge, OK but nothing to see here then I got to the other side and:

The elephant on the left in the picture on the right clearly did not like me. I know people who have been around elephants in Africa and they said that you cannot beat elephants in a charge so I did not wait to find out so it was open throttle and high tail it outta there.

Someone at work had said to me “Why are you doing it in the rainy season” and I hadn’t really thought about it. I had the chance to think about it for the next tens of  kilometres through the drizzle that continued till I arrived in Kratie. It ceased raining enough to get these pictures of my accommodation for the night and then get something to eat.

Kratie mainly talked about the riverfront and the dolphins so, having seen the former I went to bed dreaming of the latter.

Barang on a motorcycle

03/10/2016

Day one. 13th September, school’s out so, with a few friends something to eat and a few drinks to celebrate which meant, unfortunately I was up late and half an hour late to collect the motorcycle. Bag strapped on the back and headed off out to Kampong Cham. A fairly uneventful ride and arrive in tine for lunch and then catch up on sleep from the night before. Something to eat in a nearby hostelry and sleep.

phnom-penh-12000-to-krong-kampong-cham-google-maps

I had previously been to Kampong Cham for a visit and wrote three posts about it starting here. The previous visit was at the end of the dry season/start of the rainy season in May and you can see how much higher the river is comparing the photos below taken from the same spot.

 

Shearer and Mills English Traitors

01/10/2016

Alan Shearer and Danny Mills are English traitors who do not want to see our great country ever win national trophies again but are just seeking jobs and money for them and their mates.

What else can be the explanation for their piece on the BBC saying that England should have an English Manager? Why should there be an English manager? What justification is there for former players, part of failed teams to remain involved with the team?

Read Soccornomics, and look at the best England managers. Are they necessarily English? No. The best English Manager according to the research in the book was Italian.

So, do Mills and Shearer want England to win the World Cup or European Championship? Well the evidence from the piece is that they don’t. They are not interested in getting the best manager possible for the England team. Just an English manager. What if they are an average manager but English? OK seemingly according to Mills and Shearer. What if they are the best manager in the world but foreign? No. According to them. Do we want to win? No. Just lets have an English manager. Step up Mike Bassett.

Then, what is even worse, they call, in their own self-interest, to have an involvement in the England team. Why let a bunch of proven losers anywhere near the England team? They won nothing. OK, so the BBC pays them a fine sinecure for sitting on their collective arses and pontificating about whatever the crowd are saying this week. Before moving on to whatever the crowd say next week. What measurable criteria are there for Shearer, Gerard, Mills et al to be involved in the England team? What can they transmit to the players about winning

No. They are losers. I want winners involved. Have Vaughn on how to beat the Aussies at cricket, Mo on winning at running, Hamilton at F1 and the Scotsman at tennis but do not let any of these dinosaurs anywhere near our football team.

 


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